Japanese livestreamer accidentally sets his room on fire, wins a Darwin Award

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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Fake video or not, please take note. If you ever find yourself in a similar situation, do the opposite of everything this man did to put out a fire. –  thenextwebJapanese livestreamer accidentally sets his room on fire, wins a Darwin Award

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Periscope CEO talks journalism with Fast Company

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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“The reason journalism through Periscope is so compelling is because it’s the first time the news is not a passive experience.”

“[With] prerecorded content—and even live television—you sit on your couch and just consume what’s been packaged for you. With Periscope, you can contribute. Viewers can ask the broadcaster questions. The other difference is that it has the potential to be more immediate. It’s difficult to put three cameramen, an audio guy, and a reporter on a truck or on a plane and send them somewhere. It’s easier for someone who’s already there to pull out their phone. I think you’ll see more coverage of notable events, more quickly. When the fire happened [in New York’s East Village] the day of our launch, there were 60 people broadcasting it simultaneously—half an hour before the first camera crews got there.” – Periscope CEO Kayvon BeykpourPeriscope CEO Kayvon Beykpour: “Periscope has become a medium that can build truth and empathy”

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This had to happen: Periscope stream leads to burglary suspects

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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We all scream for ice cream, but somebody live-streamed while boosting a batch from a truck in Utah this week, according to local news reports.

Police tracked down two juveniles who confessed to the burglary after posting video on Periscope, according to standard.net:

Juveniles caught in ice cream truck burglary after posting video on Periscope

ksl.com reported:

Investigators said both teens admitted to stealing the ice cream and randomly placing the tubs of ice cream on neighbors’ front porches as gifts.

I recently shared that police in India are asking citizens to “report and record crimes using the live-streaming app,” but it would really be easier if perpetrators shared their own crimes in progress.

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When news breaks: Choppers are no match for Periscope

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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Above: @JaleelKing was streaming live on Periscope from the high-rise fire Wednesday in Philadelphia.

I had my windows open to the beautiful breezes in Center City Philadelphia Wednesday night when I heard what struck me as an unusually long run from a fire truck siren, as if it was traveling further than usual.

Being an old newsy, I fired up the 5-0 Radio Pro radio scanner app on my iPhone, discovered that the Philadelphia Fire Department was responding to a major incident and tweeted what I heard:

(I later read that “a rooftop fire sent smoke billowing throughout the building” which housed apartments at 640 North Broad Street, according to phillymag.com.)

Some journalists quarrel with the idea of tweeting scanner reports but — after decades in news photography — I’ve got the knowledge and experience to figure some things out here in Philadelphia. (I also like the “Batavian’s basic rules for scanner reporting” as a place to start.)

Next, I was about to check Twitter for witnesses on the scene when my phone whistled an alert from the Periscope app, indicating that local photographer Jaleel King had gone live with a stream labeled: “Fire at 640 N Broad St.” (That’s where I grabbed the image at the top of this post.)

And there I was at my kitchen table, watching a live report on my phone, perhaps one minute after wondering about the siren outside my window.

Opening my laptop to search for more information with Tweetdeck, I found another scanner reporter and witnesses on the scene, including one resident who posted a little video and this photo:

Exciting night here. Seems like half of the Philly Fire Department is here.

A photo posted by Jake Steinerman (@jasteinerman) on

About 10 minutes after I tweeted and shared King’s Periscope stream, I saw the first social media report from a local newsroom, when @6ABC posted a tweet with this aerial view:

Action News had a full report with dramatic video and interviews with evacuees by the time they went live for the 11 p.m. news show.

But when news breaks, I am now finding live reports from people the scene appearing much faster than traditional newsrooms can match — and I have to wonder if sending a helicopter makes much sense anymore.

Wouldn’t it be a better public service for journalists to find, authenticate, contextualize and re-share what’s being reported before they can possibly arrive? Or else why should we look to them first?

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Choose your view: Periscope users covered all the angles at the Whisky Row fire in Louisville

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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From left above, these images were captured by: Dan Colucci, Kayla Moody and Toni Konz, just a few of the Periscope users covering the #WhiskeyRowFire.

When fire broke out on Louisville’s historic Whiskey Row Monday afternoon, Periscope users were not far behind.

The three-alarm fire burned three buildings over nearly three hours before it was declared under control, but no injuries were reported, according to multiple new sources.

The map inside the app often indicated just one live stream at times, while multiple streams were playing.
The map inside the app often indicated just one live stream at times, while multiple streams were playing.

At least 11 Periscope users streamed at least 26 live video reports, although there are no means to track streams which are not also tweeted when users also have location services turned off.

An explosion and fire in New York City’s East Village produced a similar outbreak of coverage on the day the Periscope app was first released in March, but such close clusters have been rare when news breaks so far from our media epicenters.

Related streams have more often emerged when news breaks out across the country, such as we saw during the #FreddyGray protests or as can happen when series of tornados breaks out.

Matt Coddigton streamed this high view of the fire horizontally.
Matt Coddigton streamed this high view of the Louisville fire horizontally.

Periscope videos are deleted automatically after 24 hours online; so, the streams linked to these tweets will evaporate Tuesday evening. The latest links are the top of the list:

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Citizen journalism meets Periscope at Washington Navy Yard shooter scare

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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Above: Christian Paige reports from the scene. View a slide show and video excerpts below.

As events were unfolding in response to an active shooter report at the Washington Navy Yard Thursday morning, local singer and citizen journalist Christian Paige fired up the Periscope app on his iPhone and reported live to viewers from across the world.

Traditional journalists might criticize this sort of work for potential inaccuracies or lack of attribution and verification, but some of them weren’t doing so well anyway.

The point of this post however is to take a look at the incredible audience response to Paige’s report and everything he did right.

First of all, the title was perfect for catching those searching social media for more information: Live at the Navy Yard Shooting in DC.

Paige opens with a summary of what happened, but also gets us on his side as he shares his concern with parking tickets and getting caught in the rain.

Talking into the front facing camera at first, Paige tells us that he sees: “police cars and news trucks everywhere,” but also asks for followers and hearts, reminding viewers of the opportunity to participate. His casual, sometimes #nsfw language only adds authenticity.

Viewer comments gush with thanks and advice to “take cover” and “stay safe” as he approaches the scene, while others offer reporting advice, including: “Look for people to ask questions.”

Soon, Paige brings viewers up to a major press gaggle on the police perimeter, shows us the same long look at the action that the networks are broadcasting and shoots a little selfie video, putting himself on the scene. The continuous waterfall of hearts accelerates.

Paige notes all the “major dawgs, big heads and real reporters” in the area but then boasts: “I’m your ghetto reporter.. on Periscope News” and the audience loves it.

Some commenters joke about cable and network news reporters and one troll emerged, but other viewers sent Paige advice on how to block that user.

Viewers bash Don Lemon and Nancy Grace of oft-targeted CNN. One jokes that Paige should “Ask Brian Williams if he shot the shooter yet.”

Paige continues to update readers on what he’s hearing on the scene but also repeats comments from viewers who are simultaneously watching other news sources. Viewers are coming in from around the world.

Comments include “This is the future of news,” “better than CNN” and “You’re the new era or reporting,” but also “Love your hair!,” for which Paige sends his thanks.

(Story continues after slide show. The complete video is available at the bottom of this post.)

Read the comments:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Dozens and dozens more express love for Paige’s reporting, share continuing concern with his safety and report back on how his stream is “blowing up” with more viewers.

Paige briefly interviews a couple of witnesses he found — including one man who reported hearing the gunfire — but he also drops in when mainstream news teams cluster around other evacuees.

At times you can hear Paige gracefully deflecting interrupters, explaining: “I’m just Periscoping live.”

Kudos continue with “Great reporting!” and “Keep up the good work.” Other commenters add “awesome” and “amazing.”

New viewers drop in and Paige continuously updates them, recapping the news after reporters scrum around another witness. A viewers notes that Paige is “right up there like he belongs.”

Users exclaim: “This is why I love Periscope,” and “awesome good time for Scope,” for “bringing the action.”

Others remind Paige to “ask some questions,” “interview some folks,” and to “keep explaining” what he shows us.

Paige notes that “I am being treated like a regular reporter.” And viewers are asking each other to share more hearts.

Paige reads more comments aloud and responds, and adds an update on closed Metro stops in the area. Before moving toward another possible interview, he asks viewers: “Would you guys like that?”

By now, viewers are gushing “You’re my hero,” “You are doing a great job,” and “Pulitzer award for you.”

We hear sirens and Paige reports “trying my best,” but notes that his battery is running low, and the audience practically begs him to recharge and hurry back.

Viewers offer advice on finding power and one reminds Paige that he had left only 12 minutes on the parking meter. Another offers to pay the fine if he gets a ticket.

We see choppers, news crews and live trucks. Then another law enforcement team pulls up we see them donning body armor. “You’re the man,” another viewer adds.

“Look at the young Lester Holt,” one commenter finally proclaims, and Paige pauses before responding that Holt is “my idol,” appearing stunned as he expresses his appreciation.

Another calls Paige “DC’s number one reporter.”

Long after the action settles down, staffers from large news organizations pop up on Periscope to cover a press conference at the scene.

If they are reading comments, they are not responding. A few hearts flicker on the screen.

Watch excerpts from Paige’s report:

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Breaking news: Periscope streams from Washington Navy Yard incident

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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Authorities are responding to an active shooter report at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., this morning, according to media reports. Here is a list of tweets linked to related Periscope streams:


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