Streaming all over the world: Ballparks, concerts and crime scenes

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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Above, from left: Streams from @MarlonAnderson8, @Lisabstark and @ScottEvansonAir were among many shared during Major League Baseball’s Home Run Derby Monday night.

Here’s how it looked when U2 invited a fan to get up on the stage and stream during a recent show, according to a post from citynews.ca about the band’s streams from Toronto.


Dan Rather is expecting to see stories break on Meerkat during the 2016 US Presidential election, according to a report from thedrum.com:
What’s new in news? The apps and social networks transforming how we produce and consume journalism
And the police chief in the Indian city of Bengaluru has “proposed that citizens should report and record crimes using the live-streaming app as part of a new strategy for community policing,” according to a post at gizmodo.com.

Finally, here’s a stream from U2’s show in Chicago, captured and posted by U2 Argentina:

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Choose your view: Periscope users covered all the angles at the Whisky Row fire in Louisville

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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From left above, these images were captured by: Dan Colucci, Kayla Moody and Toni Konz, just a few of the Periscope users covering the #WhiskeyRowFire.

When fire broke out on Louisville’s historic Whiskey Row Monday afternoon, Periscope users were not far behind.

The three-alarm fire burned three buildings over nearly three hours before it was declared under control, but no injuries were reported, according to multiple new sources.

The map inside the app often indicated just one live stream at times, while multiple streams were playing.
The map inside the app often indicated just one live stream at times, while multiple streams were playing.

At least 11 Periscope users streamed at least 26 live video reports, although there are no means to track streams which are not also tweeted when users also have location services turned off.

An explosion and fire in New York City’s East Village produced a similar outbreak of coverage on the day the Periscope app was first released in March, but such close clusters have been rare when news breaks so far from our media epicenters.

Related streams have more often emerged when news breaks out across the country, such as we saw during the #FreddyGray protests or as can happen when series of tornados breaks out.

Matt Coddigton streamed this high view of the fire horizontally.
Matt Coddigton streamed this high view of the Louisville fire horizontally.

Periscope videos are deleted automatically after 24 hours online; so, the streams linked to these tweets will evaporate Tuesday evening. The latest links are the top of the list:

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Citizen journalism meets Periscope at Washington Navy Yard shooter scare

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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Above: Christian Paige reports from the scene. View a slide show and video excerpts below.

As events were unfolding in response to an active shooter report at the Washington Navy Yard Thursday morning, local singer and citizen journalist Christian Paige fired up the Periscope app on his iPhone and reported live to viewers from across the world.

Traditional journalists might criticize this sort of work for potential inaccuracies or lack of attribution and verification, but some of them weren’t doing so well anyway.

The point of this post however is to take a look at the incredible audience response to Paige’s report and everything he did right.

First of all, the title was perfect for catching those searching social media for more information: Live at the Navy Yard Shooting in DC.

Paige opens with a summary of what happened, but also gets us on his side as he shares his concern with parking tickets and getting caught in the rain.

Talking into the front facing camera at first, Paige tells us that he sees: “police cars and news trucks everywhere,” but also asks for followers and hearts, reminding viewers of the opportunity to participate. His casual, sometimes #nsfw language only adds authenticity.

Viewer comments gush with thanks and advice to “take cover” and “stay safe” as he approaches the scene, while others offer reporting advice, including: “Look for people to ask questions.”

Soon, Paige brings viewers up to a major press gaggle on the police perimeter, shows us the same long look at the action that the networks are broadcasting and shoots a little selfie video, putting himself on the scene. The continuous waterfall of hearts accelerates.

Paige notes all the “major dawgs, big heads and real reporters” in the area but then boasts: “I’m your ghetto reporter.. on Periscope News” and the audience loves it.

Some commenters joke about cable and network news reporters and one troll emerged, but other viewers sent Paige advice on how to block that user.

Viewers bash Don Lemon and Nancy Grace of oft-targeted CNN. One jokes that Paige should “Ask Brian Williams if he shot the shooter yet.”

Paige continues to update readers on what he’s hearing on the scene but also repeats comments from viewers who are simultaneously watching other news sources. Viewers are coming in from around the world.

Comments include “This is the future of news,” “better than CNN” and “You’re the new era or reporting,” but also “Love your hair!,” for which Paige sends his thanks.

(Story continues after slide show. The complete video is available at the bottom of this post.)

Read the comments:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Dozens and dozens more express love for Paige’s reporting, share continuing concern with his safety and report back on how his stream is “blowing up” with more viewers.

Paige briefly interviews a couple of witnesses he found — including one man who reported hearing the gunfire — but he also drops in when mainstream news teams cluster around other evacuees.

At times you can hear Paige gracefully deflecting interrupters, explaining: “I’m just Periscoping live.”

Kudos continue with “Great reporting!” and “Keep up the good work.” Other commenters add “awesome” and “amazing.”

New viewers drop in and Paige continuously updates them, recapping the news after reporters scrum around another witness. A viewers notes that Paige is “right up there like he belongs.”

Users exclaim: “This is why I love Periscope,” and “awesome good time for Scope,” for “bringing the action.”

Others remind Paige to “ask some questions,” “interview some folks,” and to “keep explaining” what he shows us.

Paige notes that “I am being treated like a regular reporter.” And viewers are asking each other to share more hearts.

Paige reads more comments aloud and responds, and adds an update on closed Metro stops in the area. Before moving toward another possible interview, he asks viewers: “Would you guys like that?”

By now, viewers are gushing “You’re my hero,” “You are doing a great job,” and “Pulitzer award for you.”

We hear sirens and Paige reports “trying my best,” but notes that his battery is running low, and the audience practically begs him to recharge and hurry back.

Viewers offer advice on finding power and one reminds Paige that he had left only 12 minutes on the parking meter. Another offers to pay the fine if he gets a ticket.

We see choppers, news crews and live trucks. Then another law enforcement team pulls up we see them donning body armor. “You’re the man,” another viewer adds.

“Look at the young Lester Holt,” one commenter finally proclaims, and Paige pauses before responding that Holt is “my idol,” appearing stunned as he expresses his appreciation.

Another calls Paige “DC’s number one reporter.”

Long after the action settles down, staffers from large news organizations pop up on Periscope to cover a press conference at the scene.

If they are reading comments, they are not responding. A few hearts flicker on the screen.

Watch excerpts from Paige’s report:

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Persicope among tech tools prohibited at Wimbledon

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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In advance of their annual tournament, Wimbledon issued a statement saying that using Periscope will not be allowed, according to wired.co.uk, quoting a spokesperson who added that there “will be stewards around to ensure that their is no funny business.”

How Wimbledon will fight invasion of Periscope, selfie sticks and drones (Wired UK)

However, officials have been using the live-streaming app to promote the event:

Wired explains:

The dichotomy in attitudes between the policy and its own social media feed raises the question as to whether technology might make or break this year’s championship. Wimbledon’s organisers don’t seem to be able to decide: some uses of technology are being embraced, whereas others are being treated as a threat.

Meanwhile, here is a live list of tweets linked to Periscope feeds with “Wimbledon” in the title:

Photo at top: Centre Court an Wimbledon, by Albert Lee, used with permission.

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Chaos continues to chase journalists experimenting with Periscope

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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We haven’t seen this level of technophobia following the emergence of any social media tools, platforms or innovations impacting journalism since the emergence of Twitter itself.

According to Jack Smith IV at mic.com: “TV newscasters are terrified of Periscope.”

Meet the People Who Lost Their Jobs for Livestreaming

And that’s just the latest. Check out some earlier posts addressing the conflicts emerging around live-streaming video:

• Do video streamers belong in the penalty box? Or are raised phones “the new applause?”
• Issues taking shape around live streaming video

What do journalists think? I got a little feedback during some recent workshops:

• Periscope surfaces at #IRE15
• Journalists consider Periscope at Barcamp News Innovation
• Streaming journalism review

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Finding more reporting on Periscope reporting

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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We’re starting to spot more stories on the potential of Periscope for the news business.

“Journalists might see Periscope not as content delivery, but as context delivery,” according to a post from storybench.org, explaining how “the one-on-one feel of a Periscope broadcast on your personal screen… allows news consumers to tag along with journalists out in the field.”

Oh the places you’ll go: Tapping Periscope for reporting – Storybench

Meanwhile, journalism.co.uk has an update on How livestreaming apps fit in the newsroom.

And new NBC Nightly News Anchor Lester Holt has been experimenting with Periscope and says “That’s the direction I think we are all going in,” according to a post at jamestownsun.com.

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Periscope goes to the races

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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Young drivers are already using Periscope during Saturday night dirt track races, according to a recent article from beyondtheflag.com:

Periscope Could Change The Landscape Of NASCAR Forever
Off the track, NASCAR superstar Dale Earnhardt, Jr. recently used Periscope “to give fans an exclusive look at his life on three different occasions,” according to sportingnews.com. And nascartalk.nbcsports.com reported that Earnhardt “has elicited some help on what to do on Periscope from teammate Jimmie Johnson.”

“I’ve just been experimenting, playing with it,” reported NASCAR driver Tony Stewart, according to a recent post at wlfi.com, where he added: “I’m having fun with it.”

However, Beyond the Flag continued:

“If NASCAR was smart, they would begin to utilize this kind of technology on the track as well as off,” according to the news and fan community site. Have pit crews broadcast live from the drivers pit box to give an update on their strategy, give fans a question and answer session during pace laps of a race, or even let fans join their favorite driver in an up close and personal look at their victory lane celebrations.

For now, most of the Periscope streams with titles including “NASCAR” seem to be coming from fans. Here is a glance at related tweets:

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