Keeping comments in sync on Periscope

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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Have you ever spotted live comments which appear out of sync with responses from some Periscope broadcasters, especially when watching celebrities with lots of viewers?

According to Mashable, it turns out that “Periscope’s live streams — particularly more popular ones with thousands of users — aren’t always live,” in a post explaining how timing is everything:

“Periscope’s engineers addressed this by tying comments to the specific point in the stream when they were made. This “artificial delay” helps the company ensure comments are properly synced to video.”

More info:

Periscope engineer explains why streams aren’t always live

Visualized:

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Do video streamers belong in the penalty box? Or are raised phones “the new applause?”

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
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Latest posts by Jim MacMillan (see all)

Above: Nick Jonas performs in Dallas Wednesday night, as seen via Periscope.

Earlier this week, the National Hockey League cracked down on media members using new video apps like Periscope and Meerkat, and is now prohibiting unauthorized live streams from inside arenas beginning 30 minutes prior to each game.

But as brands, celebrities and institutions begin to grapple with the impact of widespread live video streams, the stakes may not always be the same.

Movie theatre owners seem less concerned. Hilton created a Periscope event around a Nick Jonas concert Wednesday night. And Katy Perry says that when she sees phones: “that is the new applause.”

As Mashable points out: “The branding opportunities for organizations like the NHL seem pretty limitless: rink-side live streams of team warm-ups, exclusive interviews with players and coaches, the list goes on. So it figures: Why cede those opportunities (and future dollars) to fans?”

And GeekWire took note recently when a National Women’s Soccer League team streamed an entire match via Periscope,” but then asked: “Given the insane amount of money networks spend for TV broadcast rights, are sports teams even allowed live stream their own games?”

But Yahoo Sports looked a little more closely between the lines, explaining that “one understands protecting the media rights for companies paying millions for exclusivity,” but asking: “Is that exclusivity violated by live streaming warm-ups? Or intermission? Or the coach’s press conference?

Meanwhile, HiltonHHonors embraced the new medium by inviting fans “to have a virtual front row seat” as they streamed a Nick Jonas performance last night from Dallas, reporting that the event marked “the first time an entire live concert (would) be broadcasted via Twitter and Periscope.”

At the same time, Variety reports that live streaming apps are “invading” theaters but that the movie biz is “not too worried,” adding that “media and entertainment companies stand to have more to gain from Periscope and Meerkat by using the services for promotions and special events than they might be hurt by unauthorized broadcasts of their content.”

Finally, when asked about streaming apps, Katy Perry told Mashable: “Embrace the future or you’re left behind.” Watch:

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How I got the bug for live streaming news

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Jim MacMillan

Independent Journalist at jimmacmillan.com
I am a solutions-oriented independent multimedia journalist, based in Philadelphia.
Follow me:

Latest posts by Jim MacMillan (see all)

If you have ever been any sort of live news addict, you have to check out what’s been happening lately on Periscope and other live streaming video platforms.

I got the bug last week. While on a bus from Philadelphia to New York, I started surfing and found Chicago TV reporter Stacey Bacca covering the aftermath of the tornados in Rochelle, Illinois.

I felt like I was there.

(I grabbed the screenshots above by simultaneously clicking the home button and power button on my iPhone. They land in your “Camera Roll” folder.)

So far, I haven’t figured out a simple system to save and share links, but I’m working on it.

During the same trip, I watched a Mashable reporter trace the last steps of Walter Scott, the South Carolina man killed in a recent police shooting.

In fact, I surfed through so many news reports that I can’t remember them all. And Unfortunately, there’s no system to easily track your history.

Then, yesterday, the experience got even crazier. Reporter Brad Phenow was reporting on a house fire for his newspaper in Fairbault, Minnesota.

I was asking questions and he was answering — which is how it all works — but then I asked him to pinch his screen and zoom in on the scene.

And it happened! Wow.

You can watch the report here, but only on your phone. The link leaves you at a dead end on the desktop, simply telling you where to get the app.

In another post soon, I will address more problems with bookmarking, saving and sharing videos via Periscope and other apps.

And I am working on some partial solutions which I will also share soon.

Future reports will address additional complications, including authority, ethics, rights and more.

I’m also wondering if I should just deliver these reports on live video, if only to save the time I spend typing and proofing.

What do you think so far?

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